Health And Freedom Conference


Anonymous 04/17/21 (Sat) 23:36:34 8fe5d5 (8) No.13451436


>>13451370 >>13451371 Last speaker, Pastor Bill Cook, joked that his message would be the most important of the day. He asked what Monday is. He mentions the April 19, 1775 Battle of Lexington anniversary. Then he mentions that here we are 2 days before. Then starts talking about how Pastor Jonas Clarke, and so many other colonial pastors, spoke up and fought for freedom against tyranny. WWG1WGA a prayer being spoken now, "The wind now is inside of you" candles being lit



Anonymous 04/18/21 (Sun) 00:58:27 623521 (12) No.13451953

>>13451436 >candles being lit



















Anonymous 04/18/21 (Sun) 01:02:00 430bb7 (10) No.13451974

>>13451953 Patrick Byrne said that we may all be called upon to stand up for America sooner than we imagined. He spoke right before Lin Wood. Host said he's posting individual videos of all speakers from this event on Monday.


Anonymous 04/18/21 (Sun) 01:10:01 8b7e9a (3) No.13452011


>>13451974 >>13451976 Mike Lindell mentioned on OANN this afternoon his new social media platform will launch tomorrow and all posting will be prevented for 48 hours during which he will be broadcasting important information to the public. I’ll try and find sauce other than anons own eyes.


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https://frankspeech.com/

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Anonymous 04/18/21 (Sun) 01:11:33 623521 (13) No.13452013

>>13452011 I can verify heard that too. I think this could be a big week Monday also the anniversary of a 1776 happening


Anonymous 04/18/21 (Sun) 01:18:29 430bb7 (10) No.13452033

>>13452011 Thx for the heads up about what he said. I missed his speech. Haven't seen any parts of his speech posted on Telegram. Looking forward to seeing it posted. >>13452013 >Battle of Lexington and Concord >April 19, 1975 The Battles of Lexington and Concord, fought on April 19, 1775, kicked off the American Revolutionary War (1775-83). Tensions had been building for many years between residents of the 13 American colonies and the British authorities, particularly in Massachusetts. On the night of April 18, 1775, hundreds of British troops marched from Boston to nearby Concord in order to seize an arms cache. Paul Revere and other riders sounded the alarm, and colonial militiamen began mobilizing to intercept the Redcoat column. A confrontation on the Lexington town green started off the fighting, and soon the British were hastily retreating under intense fire. Many more battles followed, and in 1783 the colonists formally won their independence. https://www.history.com/topics/american-revolution/battles-of-lexington-and-concord Tonight's speeches and the candles being lit harkened back Paul Revere's famous ride. However, these Patriots present lit a candle in prayer after Patrick Byrne and Lin Wood. In times of unconventional warfare where a 2nd American Revolution is needed, we rise with the best of our wits unified in our efforts to restore the glory of our Constitutional Republic.

Lexington and Concord




https://www.history.com/news/american-revolution-causes


6. Lexington and Concord (April 1775)



The Battle of Lexington broke out on April 19, 1775. DEA Picture Library/De Agostini/Getty Images

British General Thomas Gage led a force of British soldiers from Boston to Lexington, where he planned to capture colonial radical leaders Sam Adams and John Hancock, and then head to Concord and seize their gunpowder. But American spies got wind of the plan, and with the help of riders such as Paul Revere, word spread to be ready for the British.

On the Lexington Common, the British force was confronted by 77 American militiamen, and they began shooting at each other. Seven Americans died, but other militiamen managed to stop the British at Concord, and continued to harass them on their retreat back to Boston.

The British lost 73 dead, with another 174 wounded and 26 missing in action. The bloody encounter proved to the British that the colonists were fearsome foes who had to be taken seriously. It was the start of America’s war of independence.

READ MORE: The Battles of Lexington and Concord



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